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Project HOME Supporters

Taste of HOME Street Festival | Photo by Jay Gorodetzer Photography | Image may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission.

On Friday, June 20, several hundred residents, alumni, volunteers, and current or former staff flooded two blocks of Fairmount Avenue for “A Taste of HOME,” our festive 25th Anniversary community celebration. Adults and youth enjoyed great food, music and dancing, art projects – and the gratification of all being part of an amazing quarter century of this mission of ending homelessness. 

 

In late 1989, three sisters – Josephine Mandeville, Emily Riley, and Christine Connelly – heeded the urging of their aunt, Sister M. Henrietta Connelly, RSM, to get to know two inspiring young women: a “feisty” nun and a recent MBA graduate, who were working with persons experiencing homelessness in Philadelphia. When they visited Sister Mary Scullion and Joan Dawson McConnon (at this time, it was Joan Dawson), they brought with them a box of Christmas chocolates and a check for $100,000.It was the start of a beautiful friendship.

 

Basketball great Wilt Chamberlain has a legacy in Philadelphia—and not just due to his dominance on the court. Thanks to his family, his philanthropic spirit lives on through the generosity of the memorial fund that bears his name. The Wilt Chamberlain Memorial Fund has long been a partner in Project HOME’s work, ensuring, as he wanted, that the city in which he grew up has a chance to thrive.

 

Susan and Joe Miller know about long term,committed relationships.They met at West Pittston High School in 1953, and their relationship is still going strong 61 years later.

So, it’s no surprise that after meeting S. Mary Scullion through their parish priest Fr. Ed Hallinanin the mid-1980’s, Joe and Susan are still committed to Project HOME’s mission. They have been longtime volunteers and donors since before Project HOME became a reality! And they passed this commitment down, as well: their granddaughter Rebecca has volunteered at Project HOME.

 

Susan Sherman says she “owes S. Mary Scullion for poisoning her years ago.” Sherman, President and CEO of the Independence Foundation, offered sandwiches to S. Mary and staff member Helen Brown when they met for the first time. 

 

It was the late 1980s, and Dr. Eugene Garfield came across an article about Sister Mary Scullion. The article told of her work at the Women of Hope residences, through which practically all of the women living on the streets with serious mental illness had been able to find a place to live. 

 

John Middleton spoke at the March 5 Grand Opening of Project HOME’s newest residence, James Widener Ray Homes.  John and his wife Leigh (who serves on Project HOME’s Board of Trustees) made a transformative leadership gift to Ray Homes through the Middleton Housing Partnership.

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