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Residents

 

Curtis Stubbs' situation had become dire in the weeks before Project HOME outreach worker Sam Santiago entered his life.

Suffering from untreated schizophrenia and drug addiction, Curtis’ sense of hopelessness had already driven him to attempt suicide once. He was living on a razor’s edge and he knew it; so when Sam offered him a way out, Curtis grabbed it with both hands.

"I'm still working on myself," he admits. "But if I didn't have Project HOME I'd be in one of two places: jail or six feet under. Project HOME is a blessing."

 

"Whoever saves a life, it is considered as if he saved the entire world."  (The Talmud)

Richard Brown was a jovial spirit with a ready smile, a hearty laugh, and a heart as big as his large frame. To be in his presence and soak in his friendly and gentle spirit, you couldn’t imagine that this same person had once been an angry and despairing addict living on the streets.

 

Kim Covello is a volunteer for Project HOME and an occasional contributor to the HOME Word blog.  Her last post was about the 100,000 Homes Campaign.

 

Hyacinth King is a long-time resident of Project HOME and one of the leaders in our community. She works with our Outreach Coordination Center, is active in our Advocacy Committee, and serves on our Board of Trustees. Last week, on February 4, her mother, Theora King, passed away. Hyacinth shares her reflections in the wake of losing her mother, who was a great supporter of Project HOME and a great strength in Hyacinth's life.

 

This past week, members of the Project HOME community gathered for a memorial service for Billy Hope, a resident who passed away recently. Billy was part of our very first emergency winter shelter in 1989, and stayed connected to us ever since then. In honor of Billy, we republish this post, which was originally published last May. Billy is the resident described in the second paragraph -- a testimony to his generous spirit despite many rough years on the streets.

 
When Benjamin Mitchell first arrived at Project HOME in 1998, he felt a spark of hope. 
 
“I had heard people treated you with dignity and respect, and that the conditions were livable.”

He needed hope.  A native of some of the mean streets in North Philadelphia, Ben bore scars from a long battle with homelessness and addiction.  From his early days, he fell into what he described as the more seedy parts of the neighborhood.

 

Anabel Genevitz, a student at Arcadia University, is interning this summer with Project HOME’s Advocacy and Public Policy Department.

 

Will O’Brien, who has been part of the Project HOME community since 1989, recounts a memorial service for a beloved resident, Sarae Moore. A version of this article was published in Horizons magazine in 2009.

 

Reggie Cintron has been a member of the Project HOME community for almost six years.  He shared his life story at a recent fund-raising benefit hosted by Wolverton & Company.  He is a gentle and caring soul, and contributes in many ways to our work and mission.

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